Thursday, February 21, 2008

The "Stuff" of Real Life

A friend recently sent me an email about the philosophy of Charles Schultz, the creator of the Peanuts comic. This email had a quiz at the top. It asked me to name the five wealthiest people in the world, ten people who had won the Nobel prize, the last five Heisman trophy winners, and the last ten Academy Award winners for best actor. I failed miserably. The quiz went on, however. It then asked me to name my favorite teacher, to name three friends who have helped me through a difficult time, and to name five people who have made me feel special. Now these were questions I could answer easily. The point of the email was this:

The people who make a difference in your life are not the ones with the most credentials, the most money, or the most awards. Quite simply, they are the ones that care.

As always, it made me think of our LWB friends and how each and every one of you care so deeply for those children who live as orphans. You are the ones truly making a difference in the lives of these kids. People who give their hard earned funding to charities aren’t often profiled as heroes, but you should be. So much of our media coverage concentrates on Hollywood celebrities or all that is “wrong” with the world, while every single day we get to see the amazing things that happen when people make the decision to help children in need.

We learned this week that a little girl we have been helping medically has had her file sent for adoption to the CCAA. This little girl was from a rural orphanage that doesn’t do adoptions, and so her future was uncertain. Thanks to a woman who happened to meet her while in China, we were able to arrange the medical care she needed. It never would have happened without a generous group of people who donated to her care. Following her treatment, we were able to work with her orphanage to make sure her adoption file was completed. Thanks to people who cared, her entire future has now been changed. That might not be the “stuff” of headline news, but it certainly is the stuff of real life to this child.

Thank you all for caring so deeply. Together we can make a difference, one child at a time.

Amy Eldridge